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Contact The

32D ‘Red Arrow’

Veteran Association

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Standing Operating Procedures

For all correspondence regarding Change of Address, Death Notices, Donations, Help Looking For, Membership, Memorials, contact Edgar J. Hansen: edgarjhansen@aol.com.

For all correspondence regarding Financial Matters, contact Allen C. Wiesner: wieze@prodigy.net.

For all correspondence regarding the 32D ‘Red Arrow’ News (Newsletter), contact Neil R. Sorenson: 32ravaed@wi.rr.com.

The Official Historian of the 32D ‘Red Arrow’ Veteran Association is Kenneth Wiesner: kwiesner@charter.net.

I have no idea what resources he possesses or has access to; he has not shared any historical information for inclusion on these web pages.  All of the historical information on these web pages was compiled by me, the web site administrator.

 

Frequently Asked Question

1.  How can I learn more about my relative’s service with the 32D ‘Red Arrow’ Infantry Division during WWI or WWII?

a.  You could try to obtain copies of his service records from the National Personnel Records Center, which is part of the National Archives: http://www.archives.gov/st-louis/ or http://www.archives.gov/veterans/.  Unfortunately there was a disastrous fire in 1973 that destroyed many records from WWI and WWII, but some records survived.  Another section of the site has additional suggestions for research: http://www.archives.gov/research/military/veterans/.

b.  Check with the state historical society and the state veteran museum where he lived before or after the war, they may have some records about him or his unit.

c.  Check with the local historical society where he lived when he entered the military.  Many communities kept pretty good information about local Soldiers during wartime.  Some communities compiled this information and published books detailing local Veterans’ experiences.

d.  Check with the local VA office where he lived after he returned from the war.  If he applied for any of the VA benefits that he earned, then they should have a file on him, which would contain some information about his military service.  If he did not survive the war but had dependents, you can still try this because his dependents may have been able to use some of the benefits he earned.

e.  The county courthouse where he lived after the war may also be a resource.  Today in the military we are encouraged to file our separation documents at our local courthouse, that way there will always be a certified copy of these important documents if we lose our personal copy.  I do not know how far back this practice started, but it is worth a try.  During WWII the separation document was usually “WD AGO FORM 53-55”.  I do not think there was a specific form for this during WWI, because my great-grandfather’s separation document was a simple, half page memorandum.

f.  Search through the old, local newspapers where he lived when he entered the military.  Local Soldiers often made the local paper, more often in small towns, but sometimes in large cities as well.  This can be time consuming, yet very rewarding.  If you do not live in the same community he lived in at that time, you can obtain copies of these newspapers on microfilm through an interlibrary loan at your local library.  Plus, everyday more and more newspaper archives can be found on the internet.

g.  If he belonged to the VFW, American Legion, or some other Veteran’s organization, then it is possible that someone at the local post might have known him and might be able to provide some useful information.  Some posts maintain detailed information about their current and past members, some posts do not.

h.  Check with family, even distant relatives.  Some relative might have letters, mementos, records, or other pertinent information your Veteran sent home during the war.  Some relative may also have a scrap book of newspaper clippings or other mementos.

 

Contact Tom Bruss, the 32D ‘Red Arrow’ Veteran Association web site administrator:

webmaster@32nd-division.org.

created 13 January 2004